Search alternative destinations

or call 646 360 1200 | 917 477 7500

New Orleans Packages

Discover the soul of the South in Dallas, New Orleans and Nashville.
The home of Mardi Gras and jazz. Need we say more?
Take to the streets of New Orleans to participate in Mardi Gras!
Get an online quote
Arriving on flight from
Arrival date at destination
Nights at destination
Travel class
Number of rooms
Room 1 occupancy
Adults:
Children:

New Orleans

New Orleans is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The city is known for its distinct French and Spanish Creole architecture, as well as its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. New Orleans is famous for its cuisine, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz) and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in the United States. New Orleans has many visitor attractions, from the world-renowned French Quarter to St. Charles Avenue, to Magazine Street with its boutique stores and antique shops. The French Quarter, which was the colonial-era city and is bounded by the Mississippi River, Rampart Street, Canal Street, and Esplanade Avenue, contains popular hotels, bars and nightclubs. Notable tourist attractions in the Quarter include Bourbon Street, Jackson Square, St. Louis Cathedral, the French Market and Preservation Hall.
Places of Interest
Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, refers to events of the Carnival celebration, beginning on or after the Christian feasts of the Epiphany (Three Kings Day) and culminating on the day before Ash Wednesday (known as Shrove Tuesday). Mardi Gras is French for "Fat Tuesday", reflecting the practice of the last night of eating richer, fatty foods before the ritual fasting of the Lenten season. Mardi Gras, as a celebration of life before the more-somber occasion of Ash Wednesday, nearly always involves the use of masks and costumes by its participants. In New Orleans, for example, these often take the shape of fairies, animals, people from myths, or various Medieval costumes as well as clowns and Indians.
French Quarter
French Quarter
If you want to experience New Orleans properly, it's best to begin your tour here. The neighborhood is lively, with lots to do and see and offers a one-of-a-kind experience. The neighborhood, also known as Vieux Carré, is the heart and soul of this city, and it's also a National Historic Landmark. As the site of the original New Orleans colony (established by the French in 1718), the French Quarter has held on to its heritage, complete with street names that are still listed in French. Wander the narrow cobblestone streets to find such attractions as Jackson Square, Faulkner House Books and the Cabildo. While you're strolling, pay attention to the neighborhood's architecture: balconies are designed with baroque ironwork and hanging plants, while leafy courtyards are filled with bubbling fountains.
Bourbon Street
Bourbon Street
Undoubtedly, the French Quarter's main draw is Bourbon Street – New Orleans' infamous party hub. You'll find this street laden with performers and fortune tellers as well as rowdy bars. Although a trip to New Orleans isn't really complete without strolling down Bourbon Street, keep in mind that rowdy evenings on Bourbon are best appreciated by adult travelers. While it's fun to be at the center of the action, there's really no escaping the late-night noise.
Garden District
Garden District
Take a walking tour of the Garden District (located a little less than 3 miles southwest of the French Quarter) for a peek at some of the city's most beautiful homes. Like its name suggests, this historic residential neighborhood is laden with trees, ivy, and yes, gardens. People rave about the beautiful houses and architecture. Citing the peaceful atmosphere and well-preserved properties as a much-needed break from the city's crowded tourist spots. If you need to refuel after meandering the neighborhood's leafy streets, head to the intersection of Prytania Street and Washington Avenue. This area features shops, cafes and the famous Lafayette Cemetery No. 1. Directly across from the cemetery is where you'll find Commander's Palace Restaurant – one of the city's most well-regarded and refined restaurants (and also one of the busiest).
Jackson Square
Jackson Square
Historic Jackson Square, originally known in the 18th century as "Place d'Armes," and later renamed in honor of the Battle of New Orleans hero Andrew Jackson, is a timeless attraction in the heart of the French Quarter of New Orleans. This famous landmark facing the Mississippi River is surrounded by historic buildings, including the St. Louis Cathedral, the Presbytere and Cabildo (Louisiana State Museums), not to mention the Lower and Upper Pontalba Apartments, the oldest apartment buildings in the United States. The Pontalba Apartments offer retail shops, museums, galleries and restaurants on the ground level; their second and third floors still house a selection of prestigious apartments. For well over a half-century, there has been an open-air artist colony at Jackson Square. Local artists paint, draw, create portraits, caricatures, and display their work on the square's iron fence. Jackson Square is a favorite site for visitors and locals. The artists, restaurants, museums, merchants and the square itself make Jackson Square one of the French Quarter's most popular destinations.
National WWII Museum
National WWII Museum
The National WWII Museum is the top-rated tourist destination in New Orleans and an unforgettable way to experience World War II—from industrial efforts on the home front to the combat experience of the American servicemember abroad. Offering a compelling blend of sweeping narrative and poignant personal detail, the Museum features immersive exhibits, multimedia experiences, and an expansive collection of artifacts and first-person oral histories to take visitors inside the story of the war: why it was fought, how it was won, and what it means today. Beyond the galleries, the Museum offers unique access to experiential history, including an opportunity to tour and ride on an authentically restored PT-boat, tours behind the scenes to handle artifacts alongside Museum curators, and an impressive collection of restored and working macro-artifacts to discover.
Frenchmen Street
Frenchmen Street
If you want an authentic New Orleans experience more removed from the touristy areas of Bourbon Street and the French Quarter, head to the lively Frenchmen Street. A popular spot for locals, Frenchmen Street is a four-block stretch of live music, bars, restaurants, night clubs and art galleries. Here, not only will you find fewer crowds, but you'll also encounter cheaper eats and drinks, and better music – it's kind of like Bourbon Street's hipper, trendier cousin. If you don't consider yourself a night owl, the Palace Market is a shopping haven where locals sell homemade art and jewelry.
Weather
Springtime weather is comfortably warm, with average high temperatures ranging from the low 70s to the mid-80s. This is the time when most of the major festivals – including Mardi Gras and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival – take place. Summer sees average high temperatures hovering in the steamy low 90s, making it somewhat uncomfortable for foot tours. This is also the rainiest season, so make sure to pack an umbrella. Autumn offers a reprieve from the heat and is a nice time to visit. Average high temperatures fall back into the 80s and mid-70s. You should still keep an eye on the weather report: Late August and September mark the height of hurricane season (which poses a threat from June to November). However, less stifling weather and plenty of cultural events make the Big Easy more enjoyable to visit now than during the summer. Winter marks a sweet spot in New Orleans tourism. The city has had time to cool off (with average high temperatures resting in the 60s), and the springtime festivals haven't started yet. If you can swing it, try to visit around the holidays when the city is spruced up in seasonal decor.

Address
Corporate Head Office:
745 Fifth Avenue
Suite 500 New York
NY 10151
Main Booking Office:
88 King St # B
Northampton
MA 01060
Call us
646 360 1200 | 917 477 7500
Email us
infousa@wutravels.com
Agents and affiliates